Official SUNY ESF DLA Off-Campus Blog


Week 14 Report | August 22nd – 28th by t.devlin
August 26, 2010, 11:11 am
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

No, this is not an IKEA building!  As an entry in the encyclopedia of Universal Design elements I am producing, I have produced this mixed media collage of the DR Byen Concert Hall.  The DR Concert Hall is part of the University of Copenhagen  campus in Ørestad North.  The context of the hall is very unique as it is located where Ørestad City, Copenhagen, and the residential suburbs of Amager intersect.  The hall is a landmark of the area due it the unique form it takes, and is highly visible from the M1 Metro line that passes the hall and from many more areas.  Located on the island of Amager, DR Concert Hall is an anchor of North Ørestad.  The location of the hall is accessible by metro, vehicle, bus, bicycle, and on foot.  The DR Concert Hall is a venue for all genres of music and a critical way finding element for the surrounding area.  The distinctive blue color and geometric from contrasts all other architecture in the area, and is frequently used by many as a tool for orientation.  With concerts open to the community, the University is able to engage the public.  At night, the blue facades serve as large scale projection screens, reflecting the events of the inside on to the exterior.  Every seat on the inside of the hall has been tested by recording equipment for it’s acoustic ability.    Day or night, the DR Concert Hall is visible from many locations in the surrounding area making it a critical way finding.   To read Tim Devlin’s full week 14 report, CLICK HERE

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Week 13 Report | August 15th -21st by t.devlin
August 26, 2010, 12:46 am
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

A major focus this week has been compiling the examples of Universal Design I have documented this summer in Copenhagen.  Above is a collage of the Kastrup Sea Bath I produced using black ink, and added color in Adobe Illustrator.  The Kastrup Sea Bath is an excellent example of the high caliber of Danish design standards.  The Azobe wood screen takes the form it does to protect bathers from prevailing winds.  Azobe wood was selected for the building material because it is resistant to damage caused by salt water.  The design of the entire facility is inclusive to all.  The bridge out to the bath is 100 meters, and there are swim ladders incrementally along the bridge.  There are several points to jump into the water at different heights from the bath, catering to different swimming abilities.  This is illustrated in the mixed media collage above.  The ramped entry into the ocean that runs along the bridge to the sea bath is a significant accessible entry point.  Individuals with Cerebral Palsy, Arthritis, low muscle tone, and other disabilities greatly benefit from aquatic and salt water physical therapy.  For example, salt water physical therapy and adds buoyancy to eliminate the stress of gravity and eliminates the risk of falling  down to prone users, all while building muscle tone.  The lighting on the sea bath is embedded into the wooden deck is a safety feature for bathers, and gives the bath a unique sculptural appearance when viewed from the shore.  To read Tim Devlin’s full week 13 report, click here



Weekly Report 12 | August 8th to 14th by t.devlin
August 20, 2010, 11:00 pm
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

This is my last week in Denmark, and the journey home to the United States begins on the 11th of this month.  I felt it appropriate to post the national motto of Denmark this week.  While most Danes do not identify as weekly church attendees, the essence of religion is embedded within the culture.  Taking care of one another is what the welfare state of Denmark does best.  There is not a negative connotation attached to the word welfare in Denmark, as the government looks out for all.  I have been so grateful to experience a country that lives life many times larger than it’s geographical size.  Denmark has fought hard and continues to fight to preserve it’s unique and defining culture, as it could easily fade  if not protected.   To read my last weekly report on foreign soil, then click here.

Live well and be well,

Tim



Weekly Report 11 | August 1st to 7th by t.devlin
August 20, 2010, 10:44 pm
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

The Sømærk Apartments in Copenhagen give a new meaning to waterfront living – they are built ON the water itself as seen in the section above.  The landscape around these 5 buildings of rental and owner occupied units is related to use of the water.  Located in the inner harbor, the location allows for boat travel to the Baltic Sea, and the greater bodies of water in Europe.  The boat is valued for more than recreational purposes.  The programming of the buildings allows dock space for large and small boats for owners and visitors.  There are several protected swimming areas, which takes the place of any significant yard or landscape.  There are fish cleaning stations under each building, and a community center at the very end of the complex reaching out into the harbor.  Parking is kept below grade to reduce visual clutter and create an environment around the buildings that privileges people, not the automobile.  Every detail surrounding the exterior of these buildings is well thought out and takes advantage  of the water the buildings are set on.  The design is orientated for safe and efficient boat and water use.  If you are curious and want to read the full version of my Week 11 Report, then CLICK HERE

Skål,

Tim



Weekly Report 10 | July 25th to July 31st by t.devlin
August 20, 2010, 10:25 pm
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

For many of us, we don’t think twice about something so simple as crossing the street.  It is something we do day in, day out and becomes a rather insignificant part of the day.  However, for someone with a disability the minor daily tasks such as this become monumental obstacles, and require dependence on someone else for guidance, or the use of a device to improve mobility.  Copenhagen’s approach to street crossings in the urban environment has many Universal Design applications.  Designing for two senses, there is a visual and auditory clue when it is time to cross.  The image above represents the progression toward when it is safe to cross.  The amount of time between “chirps” decreases until crossing is allowed, and that is represented in the blue base line.  Design for two senses is important to convey information as the use of one or more sense can be hindered by a disability.  In addition, truncated dome pavers at the start of the street crossings provide safety underfoot.  There is a space on the median for pedestrians if they happen to be caught crossing when the light changes.  For a person with a disability, having the accessibility in the outdoor environment for something so simple as crossing a street independently greatly increases integration into society instead of exclusion.  Lastly, as with most things in Copenhagen, the street crossing devices are almost always in working order.  To read my entire Week 1o report, CLICK HERE

Live well and be well,

Tim



architecture without architects it’s best! by mvdelillo
August 5, 2010, 9:54 pm
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

Shifting gears slightly here is part of my project that is exploring the vernacular of Denmark. It transitions from the previous  part of my project that covered vegetable communities by exploring the principles of an ecovillage and uses Dyssekilde at as the example. Beginning with a brief overview of how to identify vernacular this projects looks at Denmarks vernacular by covering examples such as- the home situated in the landscape, the influence of Viking heritage through details, and begins to explore the various roof types found throughout Denmark.  More is to be documented about the various roof styles in the next post.  the reason for this topic as a field study is because I had taken a class during my stay here in Copenhagen discussing the vernacular of Denmark. The class was offered through the Danish Institute for Study Abroad a program that offers designers from all back grounds to have a chance to study their respective fields in Denmark. Here is a link to the DIS home page if you search it can be a great resource for  anyone interested in danish culture.

http://www.dis.dk/