Official SUNY ESF DLA Off-Campus Blog


Weekly Report 10 | July 25th to July 31st by t.devlin
August 20, 2010, 10:25 pm
Filed under: Copenhagen 2010

For many of us, we don’t think twice about something so simple as crossing the street.  It is something we do day in, day out and becomes a rather insignificant part of the day.  However, for someone with a disability the minor daily tasks such as this become monumental obstacles, and require dependence on someone else for guidance, or the use of a device to improve mobility.  Copenhagen’s approach to street crossings in the urban environment has many Universal Design applications.  Designing for two senses, there is a visual and auditory clue when it is time to cross.  The image above represents the progression toward when it is safe to cross.  The amount of time between “chirps” decreases until crossing is allowed, and that is represented in the blue base line.  Design for two senses is important to convey information as the use of one or more sense can be hindered by a disability.  In addition, truncated dome pavers at the start of the street crossings provide safety underfoot.  There is a space on the median for pedestrians if they happen to be caught crossing when the light changes.  For a person with a disability, having the accessibility in the outdoor environment for something so simple as crossing a street independently greatly increases integration into society instead of exclusion.  Lastly, as with most things in Copenhagen, the street crossing devices are almost always in working order.  To read my entire Week 1o report, CLICK HERE

Live well and be well,

Tim

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